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    Healthy Heart

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    Keep your heart healthy! During American Heart Month, KTBS.com and CHRISTUS Health of Shreveport-Bossier will provide you with valuable information about heart health. Learn more about CHRISTUS Health here.

    Visit the Healthy Heart Page
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    Timing of heart attack tied to death risk

    Heart attack patients are more likely to die if they arrive at the hospital at night or on a weekend, a large new review finds. More>>

    'Microparticles' show promise in healing damaged hearts

    Quick treatment with a new "microparticle" therapy might significantly reduce the damage caused by a heart attack, according to a new study conducted in mice. More>>

    Living a full life, irregular heartbeat and all

    Lawrence Schmelz spent a lot of time in the gym keeping his body fit -- up to two hours a day, every day, at age 50. But that changed one morning six years ago. More>>

    Fitness in teen years may guard against heart trouble later

    People who are aerobically fit as teenagers are less likely to have a heart attack in middle age, a study of nearly 750,000 Swedish men suggests. More>>

    Walk more to cut heart attack and stroke risk

    Walking more is a simple way for people at high risk for type 2 diabetes to greatly reduce their risk of heart disease, a new study suggests. More>>

    Mild heart disease may pose equal risks for men, women

    Men and women with mild heart disease share the same risks, at least over the short term, a new study suggests. More>>

    How to slash heart risks tied to obesity

    Obese or overweight people who lower their blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar levels could cut their risk of heart disease and stroke by more than half, a new study indicates. More>>

    Eyes might be window into common heart disorder

    Damage to the blood vessels of the eyes or kidneys might help identify people who are at raised risk for a common type of heart-rhythm disorder, a new study suggests. More>>

    Text message from your heart doc: 'Take your medicine'

    In the future, better care for heart patients may be just a text message away. More>>

    Brush your teeth, help save your heart?

    Having healthy gums is good for your heart, a new study says. More>>

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      WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...
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