Former state Sen. Greg Tarver was paid $750 a month as a consultant for Nationwide Parking of Shreveport, the company that got the potentially lucrative city contract to collect parking fees at Regional Airport. Tarver, who spent nearly three decades in the Louisiana Legislature and the Shreveport City Council, is the brother-in-law of the minority owner of Nationwide Parking and is considered a political power broker in Shreveport.. Nationwide, which has filed bankruptcy, lists the city of Shreveport as its largest creditor. Nationwide collected parking fees at the airport and owes the city more than $600,000. Records submitted to the city by Nationwide show Tarver was paid $42,000 from September 2005 to March 2010. Tarver said he hasn't gotten the $750 a month consulting fee since March. Tarver said he worked to get the company business in Baton Rouge and Alexandria and wasn't involved with Shreveport Regional Airport. But Tarver said he's not the story: It's why the administration of Mayor Cedric Glover and airport management let Nationwide's bill get so high. City records show Nationwide starting falling behind on payments last year. It wasn't replaced as the airport parking contractor until this week. "They ignored that and did not collect their money," Tarver said. "And Nationwide should have been out (as the parking contractor) a year ago. It's pretty clear that they're trying to camouflage this whole situation and hide their gross incompetence." Tarver's brother-in-law, Floyd Kirksey, is listed as a 40 percent owner of Nationwide Parking of Shreveport. Kirksey said he resigned as a company officer at the request of the majority owner in 2004 and hasn't been paid since. "I still own 40 percent of the company, but 40 percent of nothing is nothing," Kirksey said. "I don't know anything about it now. The company was very reputable when I was a part of it. It's very disappointing." Nationwide has blamed its problems in Shreveport on the economy and fewer people flying out of the airport. Kirksey, who works as a liaison between the Caddo district attorney and government and civic groups, is currently the subject of a complaint that he attacked Shreveport City Councilman Calvin Lester during a dispute last month. Shreveport police have investigated and passed the case to the attorney general's office for review. No charges have been filed. Mayor Cedric Glover said his administration plans to file suit in an effort to collect the money it is owed, although city officials acknowledge they know it is a longshot to get all the money. Glover -- a political rival of Tarver, who is backing one of Glover's challengers in this fall's mayor's race -- said the city was considering including Tarver and Kirksey in a lawsuit to recover money Nationwide owes.

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